How to Make A QR Codes In 4 Quick Steps

This post is to help marketers reach more audience using QR codes. Learn how to create your own, and how you can augment the chance of consumers scanning them. These are the 4 quick steps to creating your QR code and a start to reaching more audience

Step 1: Select a QR code generator

There are tons of generators out there, but a few of the popular ones are Kaywa, GOQR.me, Visualead, and QR Stuff. Things to search for when choosing a code generator are whether you can track and analyze performance, if it allows you to design a code that’s unique to your startup logo design, and if it is compatible with common QR code readers.

Step 2: Design and link it up

The mesmerizing part of creating QR is customizing the design of the code to your startup logo design. Want your code to look like your custom logo? Go for it. Want it to reflect your website’s design scheme? Choose it.

Let’s take an example of a QR code generator and walk you through the steps to creating it. I will recommend GOQR.me. When you launch it, Do these:

1. Select what type of content you want your QR to send the consumer to – you can choose a URL.

2. Insert the content (Embed the URL)

3. Check out the preview, customize as desired, then download and/or embed where needed.

Step 3: Test the QR code

With all the euphoria in creating your first QR, don’t forget to check that the code “reads” correctly, and be sure to try more than just one reader. A good place to start is the free tool Google Goggles, which takes a picture and then tells you what link or item it “reads to.” Another free tool is QR Code Reader, which automatically takes you to whatever it “reads.” Apple’s Passbook also offers a built-in code reader on iOS 7, so you should test to make sure your code is readable there, as well.

Step 4: Track and analyze performance

As a marketing ordeal, you should follow up on any campaigns using QR to see whether they’re actually working. How much traffic comes from each specific code? Are people scanning your code but not redeeming their offer once they get to the landing page? Or are they not even cajoled to scan your code? Comprehending this will hep troubleshoot and churn your poorly performing QR to viable ensembles. I recommend you include a UTM tracking code on your URL so you can better measure performance – this is particularly important if you are a marketer who needs more in-depth reporting on your campaigns.

QR Code Best Practices: Some Important Do’s and Don’ts

Now that you know simple the creation is, let’s talk about some best practices that will help increase the precipice of your users scanning it.

QR Code Do’s

1. Put codes in places where scanning is easy, and there is enough for the consumer to actually scan the code. While you incessantly see QR codes on billboards and TV commercials, they’re not exactly the most user-friendly locations. Think of places and mediums where consumers have the time to scan the code.

2. Is your website optimized for mobile? Consumers will be on their phone when scanning the QR code, so they should be brought to a page with a positive mobile experience.

3. Offer a call-to-action with the code – that is to say, tell people explicitly what they’re supposed to do when they see the code, and what they’ll receive if they do it.

QR Code Don’ts

1. Don’t require a special QR scanner. Your Qr code should be app-agnostic so anyone can scan your code with any reader. Alleviating barrier to entry makes success more likely for you and the user.

2. Don’t use a QR code just for the sake of using one. For instance, it’s common for marketers to think, “How can I bridge the offline experience with the online experience? ” That’s not wrong… but it’s not always right, either. If you have content that is valuable to a mobile user, then use the QR. It will not only spur new consumers but also create a colossal success for you because most people don’t do it.

I hope this has been helpful.